Traditional Mexican Food In the Heart of Old Town San Diego

tequila

Tag Tequila Tag

We’re the Best Around!

That’s right, we’re certified, awarded Best Mexican food in San Diego! A few days ago the California Restaurant Association named the Cafe Coyote the best Mexican food in town. Sure, we’ve gotten the award before (four times!), but we figured it was time to come out of retirement and really wow everyone again.

The ceremony was a blast, with over 1,200 people in the restaurant industry and awards for just about every category. But the real pleasure was that the CRA raised over $160,000 to help promote the best equipment and education for people in the food service industry.

We went up against some pretty stiff competition, but in the end, our blend of atmosphere, great food, and delightful margaritas pushed us to the top. But we couldn’t have done it without all of our amazing customers and amazing staff, and we want to offer something up as a way of thanks. In addition to our regular specials, we’re giving away an order of chips and dips for each table. That’s one of the things that made us famous!

Plus, we’ve got a bunch of other great specials going on to celebrate. Make a reservation for Father’s Day and we’ll give you a commemorative glass for the occasion! You can also join us for Taco Tuesday, Tequila and Lobster Thursday, or on any day of the week to taste our delicious monthly specials. It’s a great way to enjoy the taco of the week, new tequila drinks, and our famous lobster dish.

Join us this month to celebrate and enjoy some of the best food and drinks we have to offer! We’re always happy to see you, whether you’ve a regular, or you’ve never been around before. No matter what kind of Mexican fare you’re looking for, be it tacos, any manner of tequila drink, or just a nice dining atmosphere with a dash of entertainment, come by and pay us a visit. You’ll see why they say we serve the best Mexican in San Diego!

Celebrating Valentine’s Day in San Diego

Valentine’s Day in San Diego has never been more fun than when it is spent at Café Coyote! On this special night we have three romantic options for you to start the night off right:

  1. A beautiful three-course menu for $20/person, add perfectly selected Tequila pairings for $10 and things will get real hot!
  2. Fresh lobster dinner guaranteed to impress your lover – $34.95/person
  3. Lastly, delicious Rose Margaritas for only $7.95 /each

If you want to show your lover how much Valentine’s Day means to a romantic like you, let us recommend a few facts about the holiday to weave into conversation throughout the night:

  • In 496 Pope Gelasius I pronounced February 14  tobe St. Valentine’s Day.
  • In the 1800s stories popped up that St. Valentine’s Day dated back to Rome and the festival of Lupercalia on the 15th of February, this was later disproved.
  • It is now widely accepted that St. Valentine’s Day is a Middle Age tradition of choosing a romantic partner on the day believed to be when birds began mating each spring.
  • It is not clear whom Pope Gelasiusintended to honor with Valentine’s Day. According the Catholic Encyclopedia, there were three early Christian saints by that name. One was a priest in Rome, another a bishop in Terni, and of a third St. Valentine died with very little known about him.Most interestingly all three saints were martyred on Feb. 14!
  • In 1969, the Catholic Church revised holidays with questionable origins and removed the feast of Valentine’s Day from the church’s official calendar.
  • The tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States until the 1850s.
  • Todaythe holiday has become a success that according to the Greeting Card Association of America accounts for 25% of all cards sent each year.

 

Visiting Tequila Country

If you want to have the best experience visiting tequila distilleries in Mexico you must plan in advance. Tequila, Jalisco is the most tourist friendly if you want to see some great tequila production. About 90 % of all tequila distilleries are located in this town and many are open for public tours. La Rojeña (Jose Cuervo), La Fortaleza (Los Abuelos), La  Alborada (El Gran Jubileo) and La Cofradia ( Casa Noble) are just a few distilleries you can visit in this magical pueblo.

It is crucial to make an appointment to see any distillery because there are times of the year when they do not open. November 29-December 13th is the town’s annual tequila fair. It is sometimes difficult to visit distilleries during this time because this a two week holiday for them. If you are looking for a place to party, this time of the year is filled with festivities, food, music and great tequila. Spring Break is another time of the year when it is difficult to visit a distillery in Mexico. Most people from the town take advantage of the long break and go to the beach cities to vacation.

For a list of distilleries of Mexico you can go to the website tequila.net and find information of names, addresses and phone numbers were you could contact an executive to schedule a distillery tour to the distillery that makes your favorite tequila. Tequila Jalisco is a little over an hour from Guadalajara’s International Airport. It is wise to book a hotel in Guadalajara to take advantage of the sightseeing in this great city. You can spend all day in Tequila and enjoy the nightlife of the big city.

If you want visit a distillery in the highlands of Jalisco plan for a longer day of travel and make sure you have booked an appointment because most distilleries are not open to the public. In the highlands one can find brands like Patrón, Cazadores, Siete Leguas, Don Julio, and El Tesoro De Don Felipe. These are great distilleries to visit but advanced notice can make your trip worthwhile.

Do pace yourself if drinking tequila at a distillery. Sometime you can drink tequila right after it has been distilled. This tequila comes out at 55 percent alcohol and does hit you harder than tequila that has already been bottled. Eat something before you begin drinking and drink plenty of water. Don’t forget to tip your tour guide. They work hard at making your visit a great experience. I hope you learn a lot.

Salud!

How to Appreciate Good Tequila?

December 16, 2010

One of the most popular rituals used when drinking tequila is the famous shot. Salt licked off the top of your hand, tequila and finally biting into a wedge of lime. This ritual dates back to the 1930’s flu epidemic in Mexico. It is said that doctors would prescribe this to their patients to kill the germs. The salt and lime was used help extinguish the tequila burn and sometimes bad taste. This ritual is sometimes practiced today due to the fact that tequila education has not reached out to everyone.

Quality tequila has emerged from the numerous low quality, “mixto” tequilas that flood the market. It is all about 100 percent agave tequilas now. Tequila that tastes good, is complex and does not give you a hangover is what many people are discovering. The question is, do we continue to shoot back a product that took so long to create?

I have learned that there is a better way to consume tequila. Sipping on tequila is an alternative to help you appreciate its complex aromas and flavors. First choose tequila that is 100 percent agave to avoid hangovers. The glass you select is also crucial when tasting tequila. A brandy snifter or a Ridel flute-like tequila glass is a perfect selection because it has a stem that you can hold so that your hand does not warm up the content. It also permits you to swirl it to funnel up the alcohol and is wide enough to let you put your nose in it without getting to close to the liquid.

Step one: Pour about an ounce and a half of tequila in a nice glass.

Step two: use your sense of sight to look at the liquid. If the tequila is not aged it should be as clear as water.  If the tequila is aged it should have a gold to amber color. This depends on how long it is aged. A quality tequila should not have any sediments in it. Give it a swirl and it should form a nice viscous neck with slow dripping tears or legs. This is the body of the tequila.

Step three: use your sense of smell. After the swirl let a sit for about 30 seconds before you “nose” it. If you nose it right away the primary alcohols give you a burning sensation. Let it breath to let the strong alcohols funnel out. Take your time to discover the complex aromatics. 600 different aromas have been discovered in tequila so far.

Step four: use your sense of taste. The key here is sipping. Your tongue perceives four basic components of taste: Sweet on the tip of the tongue, salty and acidic on the lateral parts and bitter on the back of the tongue. Start by making sure that the front of the tongue is exposed to the tequila first and the back last. This will permit you to discover more flavors. The finish is when you swallow the liquid. Is it smooth, rough, silky? These are only some of the adjectives used to describe the finish but there are more.

Repeat these steps more than once to let your senses and the tequila open up. Soon you will discover and find that there is more to just shooting back good tequila.

Salud!!!

Tequila vs. Mezcal

One of the biggest misconceptions that I encounter when I talk to my customers about tequila is the question about the worm in the bottle. Today I would like to clarify the worm myth.

It is quit simple; tequila never has a worm in the bottle. The spirit that sometimes has the worm in the bottle is called mezcal.

Tequila and mezcal are related but differ in many ways. Mezcal has been around since the 16th century. Tequila is simply the son of this mother spirit. Tequila is a type of mezcal but has acquired the name of its town, Tequila to distinguish itself from mezcals that are produced in states such as Oaxaca, San Luis Potosi, Durango and Zacatecas.

To be called tequila, the agaves used for tequila production can only come from the entire state of Jalisco and selected counties of the states of Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas. Tequila can only be distilled from only one variety of agave, the Agave Tequilana Weber Azul.

Though tequila is generally known to be a type of mezcal, rules and regulations have been implemented to distinguish between these two spirits from Mexico. Since tequila goes through a steam cooking process, in masonry or stainless steel autoclaves (steam pressure cookers) the end product conserves a steamed agave flavor that is most notable in blanco (silver) tequilas. You will never see a bottle of tequila that has the name mezcal on the bottle or vice versa.

Mezcal can be made from various types of agaves such as: Espadin, Tóbala (wild agave), Cierego and Mexicano, just to mention a few. One of the most notable features about mezcal is its production. The traditional method of roasting the agave in underground wood-fired pits, stone milling, and distilling in small batches using small copper pot stills helps mezcal aquire its smokiness, unique aromas and flavors. It is important to note that some mezcals today are acquiring more state of the art production methods but still keep some traditional touches to distinguish among other agave-based spirits.

Tequila is what I call, an evolution of mezcal. There is an old saying that goes:

“For everything bad, drink mezcal; and for everything good, you also should. ”

Salud!

Mario Marquez

Tequila Ambassador

Café Coyote