Traditional Mexican Food In the Heart of Old Town San Diego

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Celebrating Valentine’s Day in San Diego

Valentine’s Day in San Diego has never been more fun than when it is spent at Café Coyote! On this special night we have three romantic options for you to start the night off right:

  1. A beautiful three-course menu for $20/person, add perfectly selected Tequila pairings for $10 and things will get real hot!
  2. Fresh lobster dinner guaranteed to impress your lover – $34.95/person
  3. Lastly, delicious Rose Margaritas for only $7.95 /each

If you want to show your lover how much Valentine’s Day means to a romantic like you, let us recommend a few facts about the holiday to weave into conversation throughout the night:

  • In 496 Pope Gelasius I pronounced February 14  tobe St. Valentine’s Day.
  • In the 1800s stories popped up that St. Valentine’s Day dated back to Rome and the festival of Lupercalia on the 15th of February, this was later disproved.
  • It is now widely accepted that St. Valentine’s Day is a Middle Age tradition of choosing a romantic partner on the day believed to be when birds began mating each spring.
  • It is not clear whom Pope Gelasiusintended to honor with Valentine’s Day. According the Catholic Encyclopedia, there were three early Christian saints by that name. One was a priest in Rome, another a bishop in Terni, and of a third St. Valentine died with very little known about him.Most interestingly all three saints were martyred on Feb. 14!
  • In 1969, the Catholic Church revised holidays with questionable origins and removed the feast of Valentine’s Day from the church’s official calendar.
  • The tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States until the 1850s.
  • Todaythe holiday has become a success that according to the Greeting Card Association of America accounts for 25% of all cards sent each year.

 

5 comments

  1. […] tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States, however, until the 1850s, when Esther A. […]

  2. […] tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States, however, until the 1850s, when Esther A. […]

  3. […] tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States, however, until the 1850s, when Esther A. […]

  4. […] tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States, however, until the 1850s, when Esther A. […]

  5. […] tradition of Valentine’s cards did not become widespread in the United States, however, until the 1850s, when Esther A. […]

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